Biochemistry of Inflammation Part II

Biochemistry of Inflammation Part II

Unfortunately we don’t always have the perfect scenario as described in part one of this blog series. If the biochemistry of inflammation is working well and continuously completed, we would never experience symptoms of excess swelling or inflammation. And yet I frequently see the results of incomplete inflammation in people’s bodies—redness, heat and swelling. We experience these signs as sinus congestion, ear infections, sore throats, swollen tonsils, fevers, headaches, swollen or painful joints, fibromyalgia, muscle pain, skin rashes and much more. These problems occur due to a weakened immune system—often as a result of not following the six guidelines in part 1. Once these symptoms occur, it’s only natural to seek relief. What is commonly used? Ascorbic acid (generally believed to be vitamin C) or antihistamines for allergies and sinus congestion, antibiotics for infections, anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) for headaches, muscle or joint pain and swollen joints.

If these medications make us feel better, what’s wrong with using them? The problem is that they prevent the biochemistry of inflammation from running smoothly. This contributes to weakening the immune system. Let’s look at the details.

• Antihistamines do just what the name implies. They block the histamine response. Histamine is designed to bring about that microscopic amount of swelling in the area of the dying cells. This swelling signals white blood cells to come quickly to clean up the dead cell debris.
• Ascorbic acid (normally known as vitamin C), though not a drug, acts like an antihistamine, blocking the histamine response.
• Anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, aspirin, other NSAIDS or steroidal medication) also block the histamine response and reduce swelling.
• Antibiotics, in addition to killing bacteria, also block the movement of white blood cells to the area of inflammation.
• Calcium is essential to proper white blood cell action and movement. A lack of calcium will cause white blood cells to move more slowly than normal—resulting in a reduced immune response in the area of cellular debris.
• An overall deficiency of vitamins and minerals in the body inhibits the histamine response or movement of white blood cells into the area of the dying cells.
• High levels of toxicity can block the entire process. Immune cells would be busy handling the toxins and not be available to help the biochemistry of inflammation run smoothly.
• Dehydration causes overall weakness in the body. If this condition persists, the biochemistry of inflammation will be hindered. Don’t miss part III in this series.